Party in the front, work in the back. I love skinny jeans.

These are my leatherette panel bebe icon skinny jeans.

bebeleatherettepaneliconskinnyjean

Being a klutz, I didn’t trust myself to buy full on faux leather skinny jeans, so I was excited when I saw this pair. I can still wear the chic and sassy faux leather look without fearing I’m going to scratch or tear the fabric by sitting on cement or other harsh surfaces. I came across this article in the Guardian, by Paula Cocozza, “Skinny jeans: the fashion trend that refuses to die,” tracing the contested histories and their influence – essentially making the case for why they are so great. It’s a long one but I loved the points made on how skinny jeans have been used as attire for rebels and also have made “ballet pumps prolific” and that without skinny jeans “there would have been no peplums.” Some of my favorite items to wear with my skinny jeans are my gold bebe baroque peplum and ballet flats—shoe styles that would not have the chance to show off with a boot cut or wide leg trouser. I was nodding my head throughout the read.

bebejacquardpeplumbustier

Jacquard Peplum Bustier on sale right now at bebe.com for $54.99 (originally $98).

They call them “skinny” for a reason because they have always helped me look slimmer while flattering the curves. They allow for draped tops to be worn (hiding the panza) and make for balanced looks because the jeans have narrow bottoms. They can also be topped with ballet flats, boots, and cozy Uggs. Skinny jeans are versatile not only for footwear but accessories as well, especially handbags and scarfs. I can’t think of another fashion “bottom” that can be so versatile and yet stylish.

My go to item for years have been skinny jeans or jeggings. Over the years I wore Guess and Express brands. Back when I was a true size 11,  people were surprised then and now at my “true size” because skinny jeans helped make me look slimmer. I don’t even think I realized it then, I was using the “skinny jean trick.” Nowadays, my go to is bebe for denim because they cover the whole behind which makes for comfort, quality, style (so many including neon), and no blurry censorship required on certain body areas.

The greatest feature of skinnies that the article pointed out is that they serve as canvases. Like an artist, a canvas is blank and everything you add it to it will only liven the composition. Skinny jeans create a silhouette making items such as flats and accessories pop out more and in an appealing way: baggy sweaters, collared tops, halters, corsets, you name it.

Skinny jeans give endless variations and options for hiding the panza, but are still fashion forward. The trick for hiding the panza within garments comes with the construction from the waist up. If the waist is done poorly, even the most seemingly flattering skirts make you look like a balloon instead of a panza cover up. Skinny jeans allow you to focus your efforts on experimenting with tops.

To get the “party in the front and work in the back” look, bebe no longer has the original pair I bought from their holiday collection, but does have this pair:

bebepugeopanellegging

It’s called the PU Geo Panel Legging for $69 but really is more of a jegging because the material is thicker than a legging – it does not have the pant button and pockets however ( I like those). Also, is it more shinny then my paneled pair.

One of my favorite things about my pair is they required no hemming! Faux leather is a fabric that tends to run small on garments, but in combination with the stretchy denim, it makes for a winning combination for fit. My theory is that the movement of the two textiles creates a contracting “perfect squeeze” where enough stretch unleashes for bigger thighs and calves but the faux leather is a less stretchy textile allowing for the clench. This makes for the absence of the “scrunchy bottom look” around the ankles. Let’s hope this absence doesn’t make my heart grow fonder.

What do you love about your skinnies?

saraschwartz

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